The sub trick that kills (On engagement)

I’ve been substitute teaching for about a month now, which has been a roller-coaster ride (the fun kind). On a few of those days, I was left a lesson or activity to facilitate, but most days I’m not so lucky. Understandably, most teachers prefer to leave substitutes with a work period (alright, let’s call it what it is – glorified babysitting). However, I really enjoy engaging with students, especially when math is involved, and so I usually can’t resist showing the students a mathematical “magic” trick that I leave as a challenge for them to figure out during the period. I now have a small collection of tried and true “tricks” that I like to pull out at the beginning of class, but there’s one in particular that kills every. single. time, no matter the age group (although it will likely need to be adapted for grades below 6; I haven’t tried it). Continue reading “The sub trick that kills (On engagement)”

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Card Auction (Introducing dependence)

Last month, Nat Banting described a fantastic task on his website called the Dice Auction. You should really just read the original post, but I will summarize it as best as I can here.

Cfh3p4sUsAEk2Wj.jpg_largeThe premise is that you are invited to an auction, and given a budget of $10 [I changed the budget to $15 for my students to encourage a bit more risk taking]. Everyone at the auction has the same budget. The participants are all bidding on certain events that may occur when two 6-sided dice are rolled (e.g., both numbers are greater or equal to 5; a single 2 is rolled; both numbers are odd; etc.). After all the events have been auctioned off to the highest bidders, the two dice are rolled 20 times. Each time the event that you purchased occurs, you collect a prize. Bidding always begins at $1 and goes up in increments of $1. You cannot bid against yourself. The order of the events up for auction is known beforehand. If you choose not to spend (some, or all of) your money, the auctioneer will sell you prizes at a cost of $2 per prize after the bidding has ended. Your task is to get as many prizes as possible.
Continue reading “Card Auction (Introducing dependence)”

What Hacker got right

I won’t lie: The release of Hacker’s new book, The Math Myth (And Other STEM Delusions), struck a sensitive nerve. I read and listened to Hacker’s interviews with a vengeance, and then I tweeted about them with (somewhat restrained) fury:

Continue reading “What Hacker got right”

Against complacency (What have we learned, and where do we need to go from here?)

"If someone says it’s simple, they’re selling you something." - Dan Meyer
“If someone says it’s simple, they’re selling you something.” – Dan Meyer

Last week, Dan Meyer wrote a brief reflection on Ed Beagle’s First and Second Laws of Mathematics Education:

  1. The validity of an idea about mathematics education and the plausibility of that idea are uncorrelated.
  2. Mathematics education is much more complicated than you expected even though you expected it to be more complicated than you expected.

The second law particularly resonated with me, a soon-to-be teacher. The more I learn about mathematics education, the more I realize that there is still so much to learn, and that anyone who says it’s simple is selling you something (Dan Meyer). My to-read list is growing longer and longer, even as I realize more and more fully that what matters most is not what I read, but what I do at the ground level with my students. (Side note: Last week I also began my foray into John Mason’s work – thanks, Danny Brown.)

Continue reading “Against complacency (What have we learned, and where do we need to go from here?)”

“MY numbers!” (On the ownership of knowledge)

The other day, I presented some students with the following game:

Last cookie is a game for two players. In this game, a number of cookies are divided between two cookie jars, and each jar has at least one cookie. Each player can take cookie in one of two ways:

  1. By taking any number they like from just one jar or
  2. By taking the same amount from both jar.

The winner is the person who takes the last cookie(s).

Some of you may recognize this as Wythoff’s game; on the NRICH website, which has a great online version of the game, it’s called Last Biscuit (I modified the name for a Canadian audience). If you aren’t familiar with the problem, I highly encourage you to give it a go – very easy to understand and play, but the optimal strategy is not particularly obvious.

I assigned this game as homeplay (get it?? because it’s a game… terrible, I know). Then, the other day, we picked it up again after about a week of rumination.

https://i0.wp.com/alexmakarski.com/wp-content/uploads/last-cookie.jpg

Continue reading ““MY numbers!” (On the ownership of knowledge)”

My math elevator pitch

cbchristmastree.jpg

Last week, some incredibly talented students at our high school put on an evening of one-act plays. I was particularly excited to see A Charlie Brown Christmas,  and I was not disappointed – I was so impressed by how well the kids brought the classic cartoon to life. However, the play that really gave me some food for thought that night was A Straight Skinny: a story about a high school algebra class that had been caught cheating on a midterm exam.

Continue reading “My math elevator pitch”

On McNugget math (and being less helpful)

Another great Pi Club (still a working title) meeting.

Today, we worked on the McNugget problem (a case of the Frobenius/coin problem), which goes something like this:

Chicken McNuggets come in packages of 6, 9, and 20. Assuming money is not a factor and that you can only buy full packages, what is the largest number of Chicken McNuggets that you cannot buy?

mcnuggets

(Of course, I brought McNuggets for the occasion. You know, as manipulatives…)

Continue reading “On McNugget math (and being less helpful)”

Pi Club: Round 2

First things first, Pi Club has a new member – and SHE is a wonderful addition to the group! WOOP WOOP, girl power!

Today, we worked on two problems. First, the lightbulb problem (found here):

There are 100 light bulbs lined up in a row in a long room. Each bulb has its own switch and is currently switched off. The room has an entry door and an exit door. There are 100 people lined up outside the entry door. Each bulb is numbered consecutively from 1 to 100. So is each person.

Person No. 1 enters the room, switches on every bulb, and exits. Person No. 2 enters and flips the switch on every second bulb (turning off bulbs 2, 4, 6…). Person No. 3 enters and flips the switch on every third bulb (changing the state on bulbs 3, 6, 9…). This continues until all 100 people have passed through the room.

What is the final state of bulb No. 64? And how many of the light bulbs are illuminated after the 100th person has passed through the room?

They didn’t take too long to work this one out. Great conversations were had.

Continue reading “Pi Club: Round 2”

I think I started a math club

It began with one student. I noticed pretty early in the semester that grade 9 math was old hat for him and that he needed a challenge, so we started to meet once a week or so to talk math and work on some interesting problems. (During our first meeting, we proved that the square root of 2 is irrational.)

Then, he brought a friend. Who eventually brought two more friends. (If you’ve been doing the math, you might expect 8 students at our next meeting; alas, there were only 5. But wait, that’s five students who want to do math outside of math class!) We did a few problems, but mostly spent time discussing the idea of doing independent projects that the students would present to the class on the last day before Christmas break.

Today was the first session that really felt math club-y: I ordered some pizza, gave the students the Crossing the Bridge problem (thanks, Sadie!) and some white boards, then set them loose.

Continue reading “I think I started a math club”