Some days

Here’s something you already knew: Some days are really hard. Some days weigh heavy on your shoulders as you leave your classroom, feeling defeated. If I’m honest, some days feel like this*:

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What’s your point, Ilona?

I’m not sure. I guess I just needed to look at those emotions square in the face. Tomorrow, I will try again, hopefully a little wiser. And the next day. And the day after that.

 

*(Sam assured us that he feels much better now.)

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How to sabotage your classroom culture in 5 seconds

“What you do speaks so loud that I cannot hear what you say.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Since the first day of school, I’ve been working hard to try to establish a classroom culture where students feel comfortable taking risks, asking questions, sharing and building on each others’ fully-formed and partial ideas, and acknowledging and correcting their mistakes; where all students feel that their contributions and questions are valuable and worthy of consideration. I have tried to do so by pointing out (less often than I should) when a student or a group is exemplifying one of these norms, by waiting (again, less often than I should) after questions and contributions to give more students the time they need formulate and share their ideas, by giving tasks that are accessible to a wide range of students and can be tackled with a variety of strategies, by eliciting and celebrating different solution paths, by highlighting different kinds of mathematical smartness (h/t Ilana Horn)…

And then, I proceeded to potentially sabotage it all with an inexcusable split-second decision. Continue reading “How to sabotage your classroom culture in 5 seconds”

“When I see the word ‘mathematics’…”

In our division, classes on the first day of school are only 15 minutes long. By the time students settle in and introductions are made, there is hardly enough time to wrestle and play with an interesting math problem. I saved that for the second day. Instead of going through the syllabus, however, I gave the time over to my students to reflect on the following questions:

  • When I see the word ‘mathematics,’ I think of…
  • A good experience with mathematics was when…
  • A bad experience with mathematics was when…
  • This semester, I expect to…

(The students completed the prompts in their new math journals, which I will hopefully get a chance to write about once the routine is more firmly established.) Continue reading ““When I see the word ‘mathematics’…””